Category: Cider

The Wonders of Wood: Cooperages and alcohol producers are expanding the roles barrels can play in altering or refining a beverage’s flavor profile.

A well-built barrel provides alcohol beverage producers the opportunity to fully take advantage of the alchemy that occurs when juice or mash comes in contact with wood. And a finished wine, beer, cider, or spirit can take on even more complexity if it spends time in a used barrel—kissed by the impression of another beverage.   The barrel family tree According to Henry H. Work in Wood, Whiskey and Wine: A History of Barrels, wooden barrels were developed by the Celts in the first millennium BC. As their design and quality became increasingly refined between 1300 BC and AD...

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Guest Column: Save Money Using R&D Tax Credits

By constantly generating new and improved products, wineries, breweries, cideries, and distilleries are continually refining their manufacturing and distribution techniques and developing new packaging processes. These activities can qualify for the research and development (R&D) tax credit, but many alcoholic beverage producers aren’t using the credit because of misconceptions about who can claim it and for what kind of work—even though it could save them up to 10 percent of annual R&D costs for federal purposes and much more when state credits are factored in.   The R&D Tax Credit The R&D tax credit has the potential to offset...

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Inside Cider: Cider on the Cusp

The California wine industry is such a powerhouse that it’s easy to forget that it wasn’t always so. American wine was barely alive by the end of Prohibition. California grape farmers had largely switched to growing raisin and table grapes. In the decades following repeal of the Volstead Act, winemakers were content to use grapes such as Thompson Seedless to make the sweet and/or fortified wines then popular with consumers. Without an informed body of wine drinkers, there was little incentive to change, especially for farmers. Grapes were sold based on their sugar content, and winemakers were generally unwilling...

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The Crawl: Denver, Colo.

Denver, Colo., is one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation—but we’d argue that’s about a lot more than population growth. It feels like a new bar, brewery, or restaurant (or marijuana dispensary) opens its doors in the Mile High City every other day. Lace up your drinking shoes (heads up: Denverites dress casually) and point them toward any of the metropolis’ myriad microhoods. Each has its own charm, character, and plenty of worthy watering holes. Get started with this boozy tour of four of our favorite neighborhoods. River North Locals refer to this onetime industrial neighborhood—now the city’s...

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Hard Choices: Amphorae and concrete tanks give beverage producers new, old options.

The origin of making wine in clay is subject to some debate. Greeks and Romans, of course, were fermenting grape juice thousands of years ago. But some archaeologists point to early civilizations of the South Caucasus, in the current-day Republic of Georgia, as home of the original winemakers. Seeds of cultivated grapes—the kind used to make wine—dating to 6000 B.C. have been discovered there, along with clay vessels used to store olive oil and other foods. Ancient Georgians buried large pots, called qvevri, in the ground and filled them with crushed grapes to ferment. Many modern Georgian homes still...

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